Thomas the Tank Engine Wikia
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Aside from those featured in Thomas and the Great Railway Show, several other real engines currently owned by the National Railway Museum have appeared in various pieces of The Railway Series and Thomas & Friends media. For a comprehensive list on all locomotives - click here.

BR Class 31 No. D5500


Appearances

Trivia

  • 31120 and D701 are other members of this class.

BR Standard Class 9F No. 92220 Evening Star

Evening Star is a large green tender engine. She holds the distinction of being the last steam locomotive to be built by British Railways and the only member of her class to be named by British Railways.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Livery

Appearances

Trivia

  • Murdoch is another member of this class.
  • Murdoch's concept art illustrated by Robert Gauld-Galliers, is based on a photograph of Evening Star in the 1960s.

Gallery

FR A2 Class No. 3 "Old Coppernob"

Furness Railway No. 3, nicknamed Old Coppernob, is a preserved steam locomotive from the Furness Railway.

Technical Details

Real-life History

It was built in 1846 by Bury, Curtis, and Kennedy of Liverpool as a four-coupled version of Fury's famous bar frame design.

Old Coppernob was withdrawn from service in 1900 and is currently on static display at the National Railway Museum in York.

Livery

Old Copernob is currently painted in the Furness Railway's Indian red livery with black lining.

Appearances

Books

GNR Class J13 No. 1247


Appearances

GNR G3 Stirling Single No. 1

Appears in |Thomas Goods Encyclopedia and Character Encyclopedia

Trivia

  • Emily is another member of this class.

Gallery

GWR 4073 Class No. 4073 Caerphilly Castle

Appears in The Thomas The Tank Engine Man (mentioned)

LB&SCR A1 Class No. 82 Boxhill

Boxhill, named after a district in London, is a tank engine from the National Railway Museum.

Biography

The Railway Series

Before coming to the Island of Sodor, Thomas worked alongside Boxhill for the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway. During his visit to the National Railway Museum, Thomas was thrilled to see Boxhill again and it is mentioned that they knew each other in the old days. [1] Boxhill is now preserved as part of the National Collection at the Museum.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Boxhill is a London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (LB&SCR) A1 0-6-0 "Terrier" tank engine. Unlike Stepney, he was one of the Terriers who was not rebuilt as an A1X, which was Douglas Earle Marsh's design to increase the power of the original engines. He was converted to a 2-4-0T in March 1905 for auto-train trials and was restored to an 0-6-0T in 1913.

Boxhill was withdrawn in August 1946, later preserved by the National Railway Museum and restored to his original LB&SCR livery. Boxhill retained his original boiler, although he received a new funnel from the Southern Railway.

Livery

Boxhill is painted in the LB&SCR goldenrod with green, red and black lining livery. "BOXHILL" is painted on the sides of his tanks in yellow. On the sides of his bunker, he has a black number plate with gold lining and his number (82) on it, also in gold.

The LB&SCR goldenrod livery was formerly known as "Stroudley's Improved Engine Green".

Appearances

Trivia

LB&SCR B1 Class No. 214 Gladstone

Appears in 1979 - Annual: York's National Railway Museum

NER 901 Class No. 910

Appears in 1979 - Annual: York's National Railway Museum

NER Class ES1 No. 1


Appearances

NER No. 66 Aerolite

Aerolite is a preserved British steam locomotive originating from the North Eastern Railway. It was classified X1 by the LNER.

Whiff is based on Aerolite.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Aerolite was built in 1869 to replace a destroyed Kitson locomotive of the same name and to haul the Mechanical Engineer's saloon coach, which is also preserved on the Keighley and Worth Valley Railway. It was rebuilt extensively several times during its career. It was classified X1 by the LNER in 1923 and was retired in 1933, being preserved at York the following year.

It can be found today at the National Railway Museum in York.

Livery

Appearances

Annuals

Books

Miscellaneous

Aerolite was also mentioned on Whiff's Engine Depot page, on The Official Website[2].

NSR Battery-Electric Shunter No. 1

NSR No. 1 is a 4w battery-electric locomotive originating from the North Staffordshire Railway. Stafford is based on this engine.

Technical Details

Real-life History

NSR No. 1 was built at Stoke Railway Works in 1917 according to the specification of the NSR's Locomotive Superintendent J.A. Hookham and Electrical Engineer A.F. Rock. It was designed to be able to contend with the narrow internal railway of Thomas Bolton & Sons Ltd. Copper Works. It was one of only two battery electric locomotives to be employed by a British main line company and, on one charge, could run for up to six hours and haul a load of more than four times its weight at 11mph. It was retired in 1963, having had only two drivers in its entire career. Since 1975, No. 1 has been preserved at the National Railway Museum.

Livery

NSR No. 1 is made of veneered wood with yellow lining.

Appearances

Miscellaneous

NSR No. 1 was also mentioned on Stafford's Engine Depot page on The Official Website[3].

Trivia

  • Stafford's number comes from the year his basis was built and his name comes from where his basis worked.

Puffing Billy

Puffing Billy is a steam locomotive from the National Railway Museum.

Biography

Puffing Billy appeared in Hashire! The "Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends" Steam Locomotive is Alive!, where he tells host Gaku Hamada about steam locomotives.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Puffing Billy was built in 1813 and completed a year later for Christopher Blackett of the Wylam Colliery to replace horses from the tramways. The engine remained in service until 1862 when Edward Blackett lent it to the National Railway Museum in York.

Livery

Appearances

Voices Actors

SECR D class No. 737

Appears in 1979 - Annual: York's National Railway Museum

SR Battle of Britain Class No. 21C151 Winston Churchill

This article is about the standard gauge engine. You may be looking for the minimum gauge engine.

Winston Churchill is a preserved locomotive, who is owned by the National Railway Museum, named after the wartime prime minister.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Winston Churchill is a Southern Railway Bulleid Light Pacific 4-6-2 originally numbered 21C151, later renumbered 34051 by British Railways on 23rd October 1948. Built in Brighton Works in December 1946, he hauled the late Winston Churchill's funeral train on 30th January 1965, only to be withdrawn from service on 19th September 1965.

Livery

Winston Churchill was originally painted in Bulleid's malachite green with yellow lining and sunshine lettering. He was repainted in British Railways' Deep Bronze green in December 1950.

Appearances

Trivia

SR Merchant Navy Class No. 35029 Ellerman Lines

Appears in 1979 - Annual: York's National Railway Museum

See also

References


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