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Several other real standard gauge tender locomotives have appeared in Thomas & Friends media.

BR Standard Class 4MT No. 75029 The Green Knight

The Green Knight is a tender engine. It appeared in the Mr. Perkins' Railway segments and works at the North Yorkshire Moors Railway.

After a crack in the firebox was discovered in 2015, The Green Knight was taken out of service and the engine's restoration began in summer of 2017.

Technical Details

Livery

The Green Knight is painted in British Railways' Deep Bronze green livery with red buffer beams.


BR Standard Class 4MT No. 76017

76017 is a steam locomotive that appears in the end credits of the first half of Thomas and the U.K. Trip.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built at Horwich Works, it was allocated to British Railways' Southern Region, where it was primarily used on goods trains between Eastleigh and Southampton and Bournemouth. Taken out of service in 1965, it was sold to the Woodham Brothers Scrapyard in Barry, Wales and remained there until 1974, when it was sent to Quainton and underwent some restoration. In 1978, it was moved to the Mid Hants Railway, where its restoration was completed. Returning to steam in 1984, in 1995 it remained out of service due to a dispute between the owners of the locomotive and the Mid Hants Railway. In 2009, an agreement was concluded and 76017 underwent an overhaul, returning to steam in 2016.

BR Standard Class 4MT No. 76034

76034 is a tender engine which appears in Character Encyclopedia.

Trivia

BR Standard Class 5MT No. 73096

Mid Hants Railway Henry.jpg

Appears in Thomas Goods Encyclopedia

Trivia

Gallery


BR Standard Class 7MT No. 70000 Britannia

Britannia is a steam locomotive owned by the Royal Scot Locomotive and General Trust. She appears in a 1998 annual story.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Britannia was built at Crewe, completed on 2 January 1951. She was the first British Railways standard locomotive to be built and the first of 55 locomotives of the Britannia class.

Britannia was withdrawn in May 1966, after 15 years of service. She is currently owned by the Royal Scot Locomotive and General Trust.

Livery

Britannia is currently painted with the British Railways' dark green livery with orange and black lining. Her number is painted on the sides of his cab in cream. In addition, she has red and gold nameplates on the side of her smoke deflectors.

Appearances

Books

BR Standard Class 8P No. 71000 Duke of Gloucester

Duke of Gloucester is a preserved steam locomotive. It is mentioned in Sodor: Reading Between the Lines.

A waybill was deliberately altered by railwaymen so that No 71000 Duke of Gloucester was moved to Dai Woodham's Yard in Barry, from where it was possible to save the locomotive, rather than some other scrapyard where the engine would have immediately been cut up.

BR Standard Class 9F No. 92214 Cock O' The North

Cock O' The North is a tender engine which appeared in the Mr. Perkins' Railway segments.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Livery

Cock O' The North is painted in BR black livery.

Trivia

  • Murdoch is another member of this class.

CR 812 Class No. 828

828 is a preserved CR 812 tender engine that works on the Strathspey Railway in Scotland that makes an appearance in the Character Encyclopedia. It is the sole survivor of the CR 812 locomotive class.

Donald, Douglas and Edward's Ghost Engine are other members of this class.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Livery

Appearances

Trivia

  • 828 has previously been used to protray Donald at Days Out with Thomas events.
  • In 2022, 828 attended a Scottish themed event at the Spa Valley Railway alongside the Mid Hants Railway's replica of Douglas created for Days Out with Thomas events.
  • In Thomas Goods Encyclopedia, the illustration is based on 828 in its LMS livery. It is incorrectly illustrated with a fictitious number 1758, whereas the correct LMS number is 17566.

Gallery

China Railways RM Class No. 1247

China Railways RM Class No. 1247 is a steam locomotive that appears in The Making of The Great Race.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built in 1958 by the Sifang Workshops (China) this steam locomotive was used mainly on fast passenger service on the Chinese National Railways for most of its career.

It was retired from active service in the 1990s and put in storage and it is now preserved at the Shenyang Railway Museum for public display.

Trivia

  • Yong Bao and the Mean Engine are other members of this class.
  • This is one of three remaining steam locomotives from the China Railways RM series.

DB Class 10 No. 10 001

Appears in Meet the Contenders - Frieda of Germany (mentioned)

Trivia

  • Frieda is a member of this class.

D&H Stourbridge Lion

Stourbridge Lion is an early locomotive which appears in an annual.

Technical Details

Livery

Appearances

Books

Ferrocarriles Nacionales de México No. 2708

Appears in The Making of The Great Race

Trivia

FR K1 Class No. 45

Furness Railway No. 45 is an former Furness Railway locomotive who was built in 1881 as part of the FR K1 class.

Appears in The Thomas The Tank Engine Man

Trivia

  • Edward is a member of the K2 Class, nicknamed "Larger Seagulls ", which superseded the K1 Class.

FR D1 Class No. 115

Furness Railway No. 115 is an former Furness Railway locomotive who was built in 1881 as part of the FR D1 class.

Technical Details

Real-life History

No. 115 was built at Sharp, Stewart & Company in 1881 for the Furness Railway. One day, she was busy shunting when the driver, Thomas Postlethwaite, saw cracks opening up in the ground right below. Knocking off steam, he jumped for his life, no sooner clear than the earth opened up to expose a sheer-sided hole 30 feet (9.1 m) across and similar in depth. The driver and his fireman stared in disbelief as their locomotive fell into it front first, the funnel and front part embedded, with only the tender remaining visible above the surface. The rails on which the engine had been standing were snapped off and went down with it, while the supporting baulks under the main lines were laid bare. The adjacent up passenger line was left hanging lopsidedly, its ballast having cascaded into the abyss.

After the rescue operations, only the tender of No. 115 was recovered while the locomotive kept falling further still until the earth closed over it and eclipsed it from sight. As of today, the current depth of subsidence of the locomotive is currently unknown and is subject to speculation.

Livery

No. 115 is painted in the Furness Railway's Indian-red livery.

Appearances

Trivia

G&SWR 403 Class No. 403


GER Class D14 No. 1900 Claud Hamilton

Claud Hamilton

Appears in Thomas Goods Encyclopedia

Trivia

GWR 111 The Great Bear

Appears in The Thomas The Tank Engine Man (mentioned) and Thomas Goods Encyclopedia (mentioned)

GWR 2884 Class No. 3802

3802 is a GWR 2884 class tender engine which appeared in the Down at the Station segments. It is owned by the Llangollen Railway.

Technical Details

Livery

3802 is painted in the BR black livery livery.

GWR 2900 Class No. 2915 Saint Bartholomew

Appears in The Thomas The Tank Engine Man (mentioned)

GWR 3031 Class No. 3046 Lord of the Isles

PrototypeHornbyEmily.jpg

Trivia

  • David Eves originally intended for Lady to be based on the GWR 3031 Class. However, Britt Allcroft wanted her to be a small engine[1].
  • The Hornby Emily was inaccurately manufactured using a repainted GWR 3031 Class, specifically No. 3046 Lord of the Isles. This is due to Hornby not producing a model of the GNR Stirling Single, Emily's true basis[2].

GWR 4073 Class No. 5029 Nunney Castle

Nunney Castle is a preserved steam locomotive from the Great Western Railway. It appeared in the second half of Thomas and the U.K. Trip when Gachapin and Mukku were visiting a few heritage railways.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built by the Great Western's Swindon Works as one of its Castle class locomotives, Nunney Castle was used to haul passenger trains out of Old Oak Common, London. It also worked on segments of the Great Western out of Newton Abbott, Laira and Cardiff.

The engine was withdrawn from service in December 1963. In 1964 it was sold to Woodham Brothers Scrapyard, where it remained until 1976, when it was rescued and brought to the Didcot Railway Centre to undergo restoration.

It returned to steam in 1990 and began operating on the main line. After another overhaul which saw the addition of air brake equipment and changes to its tender to increase water capacity, it returned to steam again in 2008. After its boiler ticket expired in 2017, it went to Crewe to undergo repairs to its boiler, with a completion date unknown.

GWR 6000 Class No. 6011 King James I

King James I was a Great Western Railway (GWR) 6000 class 4-6-0 tender engine who worked alongside Duck in the days when he worked at Paddington.

Biography

The Railway Series

King James I was built in 1928, withdrawn in 1962, and was scrapped at Swindon Works in 1964. Duck once compared him to James. [3] Like the other engines in his class he is named after an English King, him being named after King James I of England.

Technical Details

Livery

King James I was painted in the British Railways Deep Bronze green livery. The BR Lion and Crown crest was on the sides of his tender. When he worked on the GWR, King James I was painted in the GWR Mid Chrome green with orange lining livery.

Appearance

Gallery

GWR 6000 Class No. 6023 King Edward II

King Edward II appears in Character Encyclopedia and poster in Maron station in Season 6


Hunslet Austerity No. 2890 Douglas

Douglas.jpg

The Mid Hants Railway's Douglas replica appears in Thomas Goods Encyclopedia.

Technical Details

Originally named Foggia, 2890 is a Hunslet Austerity tank engine rebuilt by the Mid Hants Railway to resemble Douglas, with an LMS Fowler tender rebuilt and attached behind.

Real-life History

The locomotive ran as Douglas for several years at the Mid Hants, before being sold to a private owner and moved to the Ribble steam Railway, then to the East Lancashire Railway and at the time of writing is based at the Spa Valley Railway.

Livery

"Douglas" is painted in BR black. In the real world it carries 2890 in yellow and red on the tender.

Trivia

  • Wilbert, Sixteen and The Austerity Engine are other members of this class (minus tender).
  • In 2022, 2890 took part in a Scottish themed event at the Spa Valley Railway alongside 828, the sole survivor of the Caledonian Railway 812 class.

John Bull (replica)

John Bull is a historic British-built railroad steam locomotive that operated in the United States. It was operated for the first time on September 15, 1831, and became the oldest operable steam locomotive in the world when the Smithsonian Institution ran it under its own steam in 1981.

Technical Details

Real-life History

The replica was built in 1939 by the PRR's Altoona, Pennsylvania workshops it was used for further exhibition duties, as the Smithsonian desired to keep the original locomotive in a more controlled environment.

As the railroad prepared for the 1939-40 New York World's Fair, it was clear the "John Bull" was too precious for continued operation, so the Juniata works at Altoona, PA, produced this replica.

Following the fair, the locomotive went into storage along with the rest of the Pennsy collection, although it made a number of public appearances, for example, in PRR's 1942 promotional film Clear Track Ahead and at the 1948-49 Chicago Railroad Fair.

In 1999, it also steamed at the Altoona Railroaders Memorial Museum, Steamtown and the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania. Apparently, the replica rode much like the original and is surprisingly powerful for its size.

It is now on static display at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania.

Trivia

  • The original John Bull was built in 1831 by Robert Stephenson and Company, and it used to run at the Camden and Amboy Railroad (C&A), the first railroad in New Jersey. Now it resides at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C..
  • Work to restore the replica locomotive to working order began in 1982.
  • It joined many other famous operating locomotives to steam on several days at Railfair '99 at the California State Railroad Museum.
  • The throttle and the dry pipes were also remounted on the back of the new dome on the outside of the boiler, resulting in thermal inefficiencies.
  • The boiler of the John Bull is an unusual design specified by Robert Stevens.
  • Originally, the steam dome on the John Bull consisted of a brass casting that was mounted on top of the boiler dome.
  • The smokestack on the on the replica wears a wider funnel while the original one wears a straight stack.
  • In 1884 the locomotive was purchased by the Smithsonian Institution as the museum's first major industrial exhibit.
  • After being on static display for 42 years, the Smithsonian commemorated the original locomotive's 150th birthday in 1981 by firing it up; it was then the world's oldest surviving operable steam locomotive.
  • To protect the locomotive's crew from the weather, the C&A added a cab to the locomotive, and C&A workshop crews added safety features such as a bell and headlight.
  • On November 12, 1931: The Smithsonian celebrates the locomotive's 100th "birthday," using compressed air to operate the stationary engine (stabilized on jacks) within the museum's exhibit hall.
  • The replica has steamed within the museum, as well as on the neighbouring Strasburg Rail Road in the 1980s and 1990s when it made several appearances while running under steam. It appeared at the Great Steam Expo in Vancouver, part of Canada's 1986 World's Fair.
  • Since 2008, however, the replica’s boiler has not been certified as operational and it appears unlikely, without a further injection of funding, that it will steam again.

Gallery


Killingworth Colliery Blücher

Appears in 1979 annual

L&MR No. 14 Jupiter

Jupiter is a 2-2-0 tender locomotive from the Liverpool and Manchester Railway.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Livery

Appearances

Books

L&YR Class 27 No. 52322

Appears in Character Encyclopedia

Trivia

LCDR Acis Class No. 123 Phyllis

London, Chatham & Dover Railway No. 123 Phyllis appears in Sodor: Reading Between the Lines

Trivia

  • The incident has been the inspiration for "Percy's Predicament", one of the Rev. W. Awdry's Railway Series book Branch Line Engines published in 1961, where Percy collides into a train of stone trucks. After the book was published, Awdry got a letter from an ex-railwayman claiming that the crash in Percy's Predicament could not happen, so he sent the man a picture on the inspiration.

LMS Fowler Class 4F No. 44422

44422 is an LMS class 4F locomotive that appeared in Thomas and the U.K. Trip. 44422 was built in October of 1927 for the LMS and was later withdrawn in June 1965. The locomotive is currently on long term lease to the West Somerset Railway, as of December 2014, following an overhaul at the Crewe Heritage Centre.

Gallery

LMS Coronation Class No. 6220 Coronation

Coronation is a strealined tender engine from the London, Midland and Scottish Railway which appears on various posters in the television series.

Appearances

Trivia

LMS Ivatt Class 4MT No. 43142

43142 is a 2-6-0 steam locomotive.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Livery

Appearances

Trivia

LMS Johnson Class "3F" No. 3512

3512 is an 0-6-0 tender engine originating from the Midland Railway. It would later become part of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS).

It appears in Thomas Goods Encyclopedia

Trivia

  • In Thomas Goods Encyclopedia, the LMS Johnson Class "3F" is misidentified as James's basis. His true basis is a modified L&YR Class 28.
  • In the 2015 release, it is re-illustrated with the number 2012 on its cab and 12027 on its smokebox door.
  • The Hornby James was manufactured using a Triang LMS 3F with altered moulding around the smokebox, extended frames and added pony-truck.

Gallery

LMS Jubilee Class No. 5596 Bahamas

Bahamas is a preserved British steam locomotive.

Biography

The Railway Series

Henry mentioned that he met Bahamas at Crewe during his overhaul in Thomas and the Fat Controller's Engines.

Technical Details

Real-life history

5596 was built in 1935 by the North British Locomotive Company in Glasgow. He was named Bahamas in 1936 after the Bahamas, which were then part of the British Empire. After nationalisation in 1948, Bahamas was renumbered by British Railways to 45596 and transferred to Edge Hill, Liverpool.

In 1961, he was usually fitted with a double blastpipe and chimney and was returned to traffic and based at Carlisle. He was transferred to Stockport in July 1962, from which he was withdrawn from traffic in July 1966.

Now based at the Keighley and Worth Valley Railway, he is owned by the Bahamas Locomotive Society. Until the end of 2012, Bahamas was on loan to the National Railway Museum in York as a display inside the Great Hall, after taking part in the NRM's Railfest. Having raised funds for his next overhaul, the society is planning a special farewell event for Bahamas on 18th May 2013 at Ingrow station prior to dismantling their engine for overhaul. On 28th September 2018, Bahamas' overhaul was completed and the Jubilee moves under his own steam since his last run in 1994.

Appearances

LMS Stanier Class 5 No. 4767 George Stephenson

Appearances

Trivia

  • Henry is another member of this class.

LMS Stanier Class 5 No. 5157 The Glasgow Highlander

The Glasgow Highlander is a tender engine. It appeared in the Thomas Goods Encyclopedia.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Livery

The Glasgow Highlander is painted in the British Railways' lined black livery, with red and black lining.

Trivia

  • Henry is another member of this class.

Gallery

LMS Stanier Class 5 No. 5428 Eric Treacy

EricTreacy.jpg

Appearances

Annuals

Trivia

  • Henry is another member of this class.


LMS Stanier Class 5 No. 44871

Appears in The Thomas The Tank Engine Man

LMS Stanier Class 5 No. 45407 The Lancashire Fusilier

The Lancashire Fusilier is a tender engine. It appeared in the Mr. Perkins' Railway segments.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Livery

The Lancashire Fusilier is painted in the British Railways' lined black livery, with red and black lining.

Trivia

  • The nameplate the engine carries is named after a regiment that was in the British Army.
  • This engine was once painted in the Furness Railway Indian Red Livery.
  • Between 2000-2003 and 2018, it masqueraded as No. 45157 "The Glasgow Highlander"'.
  • Henry is another member of this class.

LNER Class A3 No. 2544 Lemberg

Lemberg was an LNER Class A3 Pacific.

Biography

Lemberg was built at Doncaster Works in July 1924 as an LNER A1. He wore the number 2544. Lemberg was one of the first A1s to be rebuilt to an A3, in December 1927. Under Edward Thompson's renumbering scheme of 1946, he was renumbered 45. During British Railways service, he was numbered 60045. In 1958/9 he was fitted with a Kylchap blast pipe and smoke deflectors. He was finally withdrawn in November 1964 and was scrapped in January 1965.

The Elderly Brake Van once mentioned Lemberg, along with his sister Pretty Polly, saying they were named after racehorses who won the Derby. He referred to their names as silly for engines.

Technical Details

Livery

Lemberg was originally painted in the LNER "Apple Green" livery with black and white lining. He was repainted in the LNER "Wartime Black" livery in 1942. After the war was over, he returned to his original "Apple Green" livery in 1947. Upon nationalisation in 1948, he was painted in the experimental BR "purple" livery with black and white lining. In 1950 he was repainted into BR express blue and was finally repainted in BR Deep Bronze green livery with black and orange lining in 1952.

Appearances

Trivia

Gallery

LNER Class A3 No. 2560 Pretty Polly

Pretty Polly was an LNER A3 Pacific mentioned by the Elderly Brake Van in the annual story, Galloping Sausage. She was named after a female racehorse; the brake van commented that it was a silly name for an engine.

Biography

Built in April 1925 as an LNER A1 Pacific, Pretty Polly was rebuilt into an A3 in May 1944. She was first numbered to 2560, renumbered to 61, and finally 60061 under British Railways. Pretty Polly was withdrawn in September 1963 and scrapped soon afterward. She was Gordon, Lemberg and Flying Scotsman's sister and Green Arrow, Mallard, Spencer and the Flying Thistle's cousin.

Technical Details

Livery

Pretty Polly first wore the LNER "Apple Green" livery with black and white linings until she was repainted in LNER "Wartime Black" livery in 1942, during World War II. After the war was over, Pretty Pretty retrieved her original "Apple Green" livery in 1947. During the nationalisation of British Railways was in 1948, the engine received BR Express Blue with black and white linings livery in 1950. She was finally repainted in BR Deep Bronze green with black and orange linings livery in 1952.

Appearances

Trivia

Gallery

LNER Class A4 No. 2509 Silver Link

Silver Link was the first London and North Eastern Railway A4 Class locomotive, built in 1935 to pull a new train called the Silver Jubilee.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Livery

Appearance

Trivia

Gallery

LNER Class A4 No. 4464 Bittern


Technical Details

Real-life History

Livery

Appearances

Trivia

Gallery


LNER Class A4 No. 4488 Union of South Africa

Union of South Africa is a streamlined tender engine.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Union of South Africa was built at the LNER's Doncaster Works in 1937 and entered service in June of that year carrying the number 4488. Under Thompson's 1946 renumbering scheme, the engine was renumbered 9 after the Second World War. After nationalisation, British Railways renumbered the engine 60009. Union of South Africa was withdrawn from service in June 1966.

The engine was later purchased by John Cameron the following month and 60009 was preserved on the now-defunct Lochty Private Railway in Fife, Scotland, travelling the 1.5 miles of track near Anstruther.

In 1973 the loco left the Lochty Private Railway by road and was taken to Ladybank to be placed back on the National Network. From there, it was taken to Kirkcaldy and was based in the former goods shed, from where it worked occasional tours from the Fife town. After a few years at Kirkcaldy it moved to Markinch and took up residency in the former goods shed, where it stayed until May 1994 – with the exception of a couple of years in a shed in the yard at nearby Thornton.

Livery

Union of South Africa is painted in British Railways Deep Bronze green livery.

Appearances

Magazines

Union of South Africa appears in a 2014 magazine file fact about Spencer.

Trivia

LNER Class A4 No. 4489 Dominion of Canada

Appears in 1999 annual (mistaken as Mallard)

Trivia

  • Spencer and Mallard are other members of this class.
  • In the 1999 annual, Mallard incorrectly has the number 4489, which belongs to classmate Dominion of Canada. Dominion of Canada is unique in that it has a brass bell mounted on the smokebox, directly below the funnel and flush with its whistle.

Gallery

LNER Class A4 No. 4498 Sir Nigel Gresley

Sir Nigel Gresley is a streamlined tender engine, named after the man who designed its class.

Technical Details

Real-life History

It is the 100th Gresley pacific built. In May 1959, Sir Nigel Gresley broke the record for fastest postwar steam locomotive at 112mph. Sir Nigel Gresley first appeared in Hello Thomas and James, when P-Chan was visiting the Watercress Line. It later appeared in the Mr. Perkins' Railway segments.

At the time of when the locomotive's respective Mr. Perkin's Railway segment was filmed, the locomotive was preserved at the North Yorkshire Moors Railway in daily operation. It is owned by the Sir Nigel Gresley Locomotive Preservation Trust Ltd. and operated by the A4 Locomotive Society Ltd. on behalf of the Trust.

60007's boiler ticket has now expired and the locomotive was withdrawn from service for overhaul in September 2015. The overhaul is being carried out in public view at the National Railway Museum in York. In 2021, The National Railway Museum said that they wanted 60007 removed from their workshop to make way for other restoration projects. 60007's overhaul is likely to be completed in Crewe.

Livery

Sir Nigel Gresley is painted in British Railways' express passenger blue livery with black and white lining.

Appearances

Trivia

LNER Class D49 No. 258 The Cattistock

Appears in The Thomas The Tank Engine Man (mentioned)

LNER Thompson/Peppercorn Class K1 No. 62005


Appearances

LNWR Bloomer Class No. 1009 Wolverton

Appears in Run! Thomas & Friends "Steam Locomotive is Alive"

Trivia

  • Bloomer is another member of this class.

LSWR S15 Class No. 825

825 is an LSWR S15 class tender engine. 30506 is also a member of this class. It appeared in the Mr. Perkins' Railway segments.

LSWR S15 Class No. 30506

30506 is an LSWR S15 class tender engine that appeared in Hello Thomas and James, on the Mid Hants Railway. 825 is also a member of this class. The engine was withdrawn from service in January of 1964 and was bought by The Urie Locomotive Society. 30506 underwent a major overhaul in 1998 and is currently undergoing another one.

Gallery

NER Class T2 No. 63395

63395 is a tender engine. It appeared in the Mr. Perkins' Railway segments.

This engine's boiler ticket expired at the end of 2016 and is currently having a ten year overhaul before it could return to the line.

Technical Details

Livery

63395 is painted in British Railways' black livery.

Trivia

  • This engine was the very last in BR days to be given a heavy/general overhaul at Darlington Works, hence it was selected for preservation.

NER Class Z No. 706

Appears in The Thomas The Tank Engine Man

NYC J-3a Class No. 5450

New York Central Railroad J-3a Hudson.jpg

The New York Central No. 5450 was a J3a class 4-6-4 "Hudson" type steam locomotive built in 1938 by Alco for the New York Central railroad.

Technical Details

Real-life History

5450 was built in 1938 by Alco for the New York Central Railroad.

This streamlined locomotive was used for high-speed passenger service on the New York Central's own crack passenger trains, such as the 20th Century Limited.

The engine wore the streamlining which applied to the locomotive as built, but it was removed by the late 1940s.

By the 1950, the locomotive was retired from active service and it was scrapped shortly after.

Livery

Apperances

Appears in Thomas Goods Encyclopedia (2015)

Trivia

  • Connor is a member of this class.
  • This is one of 9 locomotives that wears the streamlining which was designed by Henry Dreyfuss.
  • The locomotive apparently suffered a boiler explosion in 1943.

Gallery

PRR G5s No. 5741

Pennsylvania Railroad No. 5741 is a 4-6-0 steam locomotive that appears in A Wonderful American Journey with Thomas and Connie.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built in 1924 at the PRR's Juniata Shops for the Pennsylvania Railroad it was the most powerful ten-wheeler produced in the US and became the standard PRR commuter locomotive until superceded by diesels in the 1950s.

Today it's on static display at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania.

Trivia

  • This engine coincidentally shares Duck's Great Western number from the Railway Series.
  • The G5s class was designed by William F. Keisel, the railroad's chief engineer, for commuter service - a task which required speed, power and the ability to stop and start frequently.

S&DR Locomotion No. 1

Locomotion No. 1 (originally named Active) is an early steam locomotive built by Robert Stephenson and Company in 1825 for the Stockton and Darlington Railway.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Locomotion No. 1 was ordered by the Stockton and Darlington Railway Company in September 1824; its design benefitted from George Stephenson's experience building his series of Killingworth locomotives.

In September 1825, Locomotion No. 1 hauled the first train on the Stockton and Darlington Railway, and became the first locomotive to run on a public railway. On 1 July 1828, it was heavily damaged when its boiler exploded at Aycliffe Lane station, resulting in the death of its driver. It was rebuilt but, as a consequence of the rapid advances in locomotive design, Locomotion No. 1 became obsolete within a decade. It was used on the railway until 1850, after which it was converted into a stationary engine. The locomotive was later preserved in 1857 and put on display.

The locomotive is currently on static display at the Locomotion museum in Shildon. A working replica of Locomotion has also been built in 1975 and following years of operation at Beamish Museum is now on display at the Head of Steam museum.

Livery

Locomotion No.1 is currently painted dark brown with black wheels and funnel.

Appearances

Books

Gallery

SECR D class No. 731

Appears in The Making of The Great Race

SNCB Type 12 No. 12.004

Appears in The Making of The Great Race

Trivia

  • Axel is another member of this class.

SR Lord Nelson Class No. 850 Lord Nelson

SR Lord Nelson Class 850 Lord Nelson appears in Original 70th Anniversary History Time Travel

SR V Class No. 925 Cheltenham

SR No. 925 'Cheltenham' appears in Original 70th Anniversary History Time Travel

SR U Class No. 31625

31625 is a Southern Railway U Class.

Technical Details

Real-life History

1625 was built at Ashford Works in March 1929 for the Southern Railway. All members of the class entered British Railways service in 1948, and it was renumbered as 31625. In January 1964, the locomotive was withdrawn from service and 5 months later moved to Barry Scrapyard. On March 1980, it would be purchased from Barry Scrapyard and moved to the Mid-Hants Railway, where it would be restored for preservation and mainline rail tours.

The Mid-Hants Railway would repainted the locomotive into the livery of James the Red Engine for Days Out with Thomas events. The engine retained this colour scheme for many years and participated in The Railway Series golden jubilee celebrations at the National Railway Museum. It was the only replica Thomas character to be certified to run on the mainline in the UK.

It departed the Mid-Hants Railway in August 2014 following the expiration of its loan agreement and is currently stored at the Swanage Railway following cosmetic restoration.

Livery

31625 is currently painted in British Railways mixed-traffic lined black livery with red, cream and grey lining and the British Railways crest on the tender. It was previously painted in the livery of James the Red Engine.

From 1928, the entire class was painted in Maunsell's lined Southern Railway Olive green with yellow markings and "Southern" on the tender.

Appearances

Appears in Hello Thomas and James and Thomas Goods Encyclopedia

SR West Country Class No. 34105 Swanage

Swanage is a Southern Railway West Country class steam locomotive that appears in Thomas and the U.K. Trip. Rebecca is another member of its class.

Technical Details

Real-life History

The locomotive spent its career based primarily at Bournemouth and pulling express trains from London's Waterloo Station to Bournemouth and the Somerset and Dorset line to Bath. Taken out of service in 1964, it was sold to Woodham Brothers Scrapyard at Barry, Wales, where it remained until 1978 when it was bought by Richard Hedder and moved to the Mid Hants Railway. Returning to steam in 1987, it was taken out of service in 1997 to undergo an overhaul. It is currently at the Watercress Line for overhaul.

Trivia

Strasburg Railroad No. 90

Strasburg Railroad No. 90 is a steam locomotive owned by the Strasburg Railroad in Strasburg, Pennsylvania that appears in one of the interview segments of 10 Years of Thomas the Tank Engine & Friends, as well as Storytime with Thomas.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built in 1924 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia, PA it originally worked for the Great Western Railroad in Colorado, hauling sugar beet trains 40 to 50 cars long.

It was purchased by the Strasburg Railroad in 1967, and is now one of the last operating Decapod type locomotives in the United States.

Trivia

  • In addition, it also appears in a Shining Time Station episode, "Bad Luck Day at Shining Time Station".
  • In 1968, it double headed with former Canadian Pacific Railroad 4-6-2 No. 127 (Formally No. 1278) to help out with Ross Rowland's excursions along the steep grades.
  • No. 90 was the Strasburg Railroad's largest locomotive.
  • Following WWII, the locomotive was used primarily in the Autumn during the harvest season.

Union Pacific Big Boy

Union Pacific Big Boy are a series of of 4-8-8-4 simple articulated type of steam locomotive built specially for the Union Pacific railroad between 1941-1944.

Technical Details

Real-life History

The Union Pacific Big Boy were designed to haul heavy freight trains over Sherman Hill and Wasatch mountains. They’re the elongated version of the early challengers by Arthur H Fetter.

During World War II in the 1940s, railroads in the US were in dire need of larger steam locomotives to deliver long and heavy trains (which became longer and heavier due to the stock market boom as a result of the US recovering from the Great Depression; aside from having more materials needed to built vehicles and weapons to supply troops in combat), to whom the economy skyrocketed after the Great Depression, and many companies relied on trains to deliver their goods.

Eight Big Boys are preserved, with one, No. 4014, in operational condition.

Livery

The Big Boy is painted in graphite black with grey smokebox.

Appearances

Books

Trivia

  • Big Boys were rarely occasionally assigned to passenger service.
  • The Big Boy has more steam valve controls than any other type of steam locomotive.
  • The Big Boys smokestack were actually two smokestacks combined and covered with smoke deflectors.
  • The Big Boy was so big it could use more than 22 tons of coal and 12,000 gallons of water in just one hour.
  • Most average people and train enthusiasts often confuse the Challenger and Big Boy for one another. The main differences are the position of the boiler number plate, and the wheel arrangements.

Virginia and Truckee Railroad No. 20 Tahoe

Tahoe is a steam engine that once belonged to the Virginia and Truckee Railroad. It appeared in A Wonderful American Journey with Thomas and Connie.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built in 1875 by the Baldwin Locomotive works for the Virginia and Truckee Railroad it spent its long life as a haul ore engine, as well as a passenger engine when it's needed.

In 1911, it was converted to an oil burner. After over fifty years service hauling ore as well as passenger trains, it went into storage at Carson City, NV, in 1926.

In 1942, "Tahoe" was sold for $2,000 to Clifford C. Bong Construction, and it helped build several railroad classification yards for the US Army Engineering Corps until 1944 when it was retired. After the war, it was stored in Bong's Arcadia, CA, yard until bought by the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in 1968. It was shipped back to Strasburg on a flat car, where the Strasburg Railroad shops later restored it to roughly how it would have appeared when delivered in 1875.

As of today it is still resides at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania while it sits Side-By-Side with Pennsylvania Railroad No. 5741.

Trivia

  • The "Tahoe", like many a steam locomotive back then, had its fair share of incidents.
  • The locomotive was nicknamed "The Mighty Mogul" because it was "better and stronger" than the lighter American-type 4-4-0 Dayton.
  • In July 1887, it was hauling some ore cars uphill to Virginia City, NV, when some of the cars derailed near Eureka Mill siding. While the "Tahoe" was stopped there, the Dayton, pulling the local passenger train, came around the curve and ran head long into No. 20 causing severe damage.
  • The Tahoe is the only V&T locomotive on display east of the Mississippi.


Pennsylvania Railroad No. 3768 Torpedo

Torpedo is a streamlined Pennsylvania Railroad K4 class steam locomotive that once belonged to the Pennsylvania Railroad.

Gordon's streamlined form as the "Shooting Star" is based this engine.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built by the PRR in its own Altoona Works in 1920 it operated on the North East portion of the Pennsylvania Railroad, likely operating no further west than Chicago. It often powered the mainline "named trains," such as the Broadway Limited. It also operated occasionally on the jointly owned Pennslyvania into Chicago City.

The 3768 was equipped with the most modern fittings installed on the K4s, excluding poppet valves. It got the modern slat pilot, typical PRR smokebox configuration, and modern interchangeable tender. It was also showcased at the 1939-40 World's Fair in New York City, alongside many other noteworthy locomotives.

The streamlined casing was removed, and the locomotive returned to its conventional appearance.

It was retired in October of 1953, and was sold for scrap.

Trivia

  • Hank is a member of this class
  • By the 1940's, the streamlined shrouds impeded maintenance.
  • This was one of 425 K4s series Pacifics used on its top passenger trains until the late 1950's. Also this was one of only six K4 locomotives to be streamlined for the Pennsylvania railroad.
  • The engine was famous for its nickname - the 'Torpedo'.
  • The locomotive was featured on the front cover of a 30-page booklet published by the Pennsylvania Railroad entitled "Modern Locomotives And Cars: 1939."
  • When it participate at the 1939 New York World's Fair it face to face with Connor's basis.
  • The Torpedo was called the "Locomotive of Tomorrow" when it was displayed at the 1939 New York World's Fair. Its powerful engine weighed more than one million pounds.


Ferrocarriles Nacionales de México No. 903

Ferrocarriles Nacionales de México No. 903 is a GR-3 class 2-8-0 steam locomotive that works on the Ferrocarriles Nacionales de México (National Railways of Mexico).

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built in 1910 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works of Eddystone, Pennsylvania as No. 297 it was originally built for narrow gauge tracks and was used by the Veracruz Terminal Company and the Teziutlan Copper Company before being bought by NdeM in 1945.

It was Re-gauged to standard gauge in 1950 and taken out of service in 1963, the engine is currently on display outside the José Cardoso Tellez Railway Museum in Acámbaro in the Mexican state of Guanajuato.

Livery

It is painted black with a silver smokebox, cowcatcher and bell. The cab doors, windows, handrails and other details are painted red, while it's sandboxes and dome are painted with black lining around them. The number 903 is painted on both the headlamp and cab and it's company's initials, "N. DE M." are painted on the sides of the tender.

Trivia

  • Carlos and The Small Mean Engine are other members of this class.
  • It has been plinthed at Acambaro since 1963.
  • It was later renumbered No. 903 in 1950 the same year when it was re-gauged to standard gauge.
  • It was built as a 3-ft gauge for the Vera Cruz Terminal Co. as their No. 15 and later sold to the Teziutlan Copper Co. as their No. 4.

WD Austerity 2-8-0 No. 90733

Appearances


Northern California Lumber No. 3

The Northern California Lumber No. 3 is a Climax Class C logging locomotive that runs on the Northern California Lumber Co.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built by the Climax Manufacturing Co. in 1909 it was used for the Northern California Lumber Co. to haul log trains for much of its career.

It was later sold to the Fruit Growers Supply Co., also in Hilt in 1913.

When it was retired in 1954 it was donated to the Southern California Chapter of the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society where it is now seen on static display.

Trivia

  • Ferdinand is a member of this class.
  • It was the chapter’s very first acquisition.
  • The locomotive has been in the collection since 1954.
  • The locomotive is named "Sunkist".

Virginia and Truckee Railroad No. 12 Genoa

Genoa is a 4-4-0 steam engine that once belonged to the Virginia and Truckee Railroad.

Beau is based on this engine.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built in 1873 by the Baldwin Locomotive works for the Virginia and Truckee Railroad it spent its long life hauling passenger trains on the Virginia and Truckee Railroad, but it also hauled freight trains, between Carson City, Virginia City and Reno, NV, on the V&T when its needed.

The locomotive was retired from service in 1908, and it went into storage in the Carson City shops.

In 1938, #12 was sold to Eastern Railroads in New York and, in 1940, presented to the Pacific Coast Chapter of the RLHS and shipped to the Western Pacific Roundhouse in Oakland, CA.

Today the engine is on static display at the California State Railroad Museum restored to her 1902 appearance. Reportedly, she is in a good enough condition to be able to operate.

Trivia

  • The Genoa was restored to look like Central Pacific’s #60 “Jupiter” for the 1939-40 New York World Fair, it also appeared as “Jupiter” at the Golden Spike Centennial at Promontory, UT in 1969, and for the 1948 Chicago's Railroad fair in 1948.
  • The engine was to be named "Wm Sharon" however it was changed before it was deliver.
  • The Genoa was the second V&T passenger locomotive although it does pulled mixed and occasionally freight trains.
  • In 1955, it used to ran a fan trip on the Stockton Terminal & Eastern Railroad.
  • Bachmann's HO scale "American 4-4-0" model is based on the dimensions of the Genoa (and identical sister engines Reno and Inyo). Despite being for sale for several decades, the model was never offered in Virginia & Truckee livery, even after it was completely re-tooled in 2015. In their 2021 catalog, Bachmann finally announced a version of the model painted and lettered as the Genoa.
  • The company that built this locomotive was known as "M. Baird & Co." at the time the locomotive was built.


LNER Class K3 No. 61809

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The LNER No. 61809 was a class K3 2-6-0 "Mogul" type steam locomotive that used to run on the London and North Eastern Railway.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built in 1921, by the Doncaster Works and entered service in August of 1921, it designed for mixed-traffic work.

It was retired on March 3rd 1962, and was later cut for scrap that same year in 1962.

Trivia

  • In 1958, it lost its dome.
  • None of the original K3's were preserved; however, it was announced in September 2018 that following on from the LNER Class V4 no 3403 & LNER Class V3 projects where new engines are planned to be built.
  • A new K3 is to be built after these are completed. The number of the engine has not yet been confirmed, but is expected to be a replica of an original engine since the number 61993 was allocated to the LNER Class K4's.

BR Standard Class 5 No. 73050 City of Peterborough

City of Peterborough is a tender engine.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built at the Derby Locomotive Works, and delivered on April, 14th 1954 it was chosen for preservation in the first place. It was chosen to represent the class 5MT at the "International Railway Congress", in Willesden MPD, London, from the 26th to the 29th of May, the same year in which she entered service. Afterwards, she moved to Bath Green Park with sisters 73051 and 73052 for service along the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway Main Line from Bath to Bournemouth. These three engines were built with a BR1G tender for working over this route; the only other engines built with this type of tender were the 9F 2-10-0's. 73050 also piloted the famous 'Pines Express' until 1962, but remained there in use until 1964, when it moved to Shrewsbury.

When it was retired at Patricroft, Manchester in 1968, the year steam ended on British Rail, the engine was bought by the late Rev. Richard Paten.

It is owned by the Peterborough City Council, and based on the Nene Valley Railway, carrying passengers and special freight trains while in service. Presently, 73050 is in store, awaiting her next overhaul.

Trivia

  • It is often dressed as 'Henry the Green Engine' as part of the Railway's 'Thomas' events.
  • On 21 September 2014, 73050 was taken out of traffic for another major overhaul, which began in 2017.
  • The engine's air brakes, fitted in 1979, were modified so that the engine's brakes work in conjunction with the air brakes when hauling a train.
  • It was booked for a special on the Nene Valley Railway on 15 August 2012 to mark Richard Paten's 80th birthday, but he died three weeks before.

Chemins de fer de l'Ouest No. 721 Ouest

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Ouest was a type 2-4-0, French notation 120 that runs on the Compagnie des chemins de fer de l'Ouest railway.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built in 1877 this type of locomotive was know famous as the locomotive that done the Gare Montparnasse derailment in Paris, France.

On October 22 1895, the locomotive lead the Granville–Paris Express and it was running late. In an effort to make up lost time, the train approached the station faster than usual, at a speed of 40–60 km/h (25–37 mph), and when the driver attempted to apply the Westinghouse air brake, it was faulty or ineffective.

The locomotive brakes alone were insufficient to stop the train, the momentum carried it into the buffers, and the locomotive crossed the almost 30-metre (98 ft) wide station concourse, crashing through a 60-centimetre (24 in) thick wall, before falling onto the Place de Rennes 10 metres (33 ft) below, where it stood on its nose. A woman in the street below was killed by falling masonry, and two passengers, the fireman, two guards and a passerby in the street sustained injuries. The woman, Marie-Augustine Aguilard, had been standing in for her husband, a newspaper vendor, while he went to collect the evening newspapers.

Soon afterwards the locomotive's driver was sentenced to two months in prison and fined 50 francs for approaching the station too fast. One of the guards was fined 25 francs as he had been preoccupied with paperwork and failed to apply the handbrake

When it was placed back on the tracks it was taken to a repair station amazingly the passenger cars were almost completely undamaged. Also when the locomotive reached the railway workshops it was found to have suffered little damage. After when it was repaired in the railway workshops the locomotive operated for a few more years until it was sold for scrap in 1929.

Trivia

  • This derailment served as the inspiration for A Better View for Gordon. This event was also depicted in the 2007 novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret and its 2011 film adaptation Hugo. David Maidment showed the production team a poster of the disaster. A small picture of the real-life incident can be seen in the Thomas & Friends Exhibition at Drayton Manor at Bluff's Cove in the waiting room.
  • This was one of only 36 engines built for the Compagnie des chemins de fer de l'Ouest railway which were numbered 707-743.
  • These type of 120 locomotives put into service in 1877 and 1878, are inspired by the 744 to 897 locomotives.
  • It took 48 hours before the legal process investigation allowed the of railway to start removing the locomotive and rolling stock. Initially 14 horses were used to try and free the locomotive but it didn't work. In the end it took 10 men using a 250 ton winch to lower the locomotive to the ground and then lifted back into the station.
  • The locomotives will be registered 120-751 to 800 to the State and circulate until 1929.


Cumberland Valley No. 972

Cumberland Valley No. 972 is a class D-10j 4-6-0 steam locomotive that was seen at the Strasburg Rail Road while sits in storage in 10 Years of Thomas the Tank Engine & Friends.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built by the Montreal Locomotive Works in 1912 for the Canadian Pacific Railway it was used for pulling branch line and mainline freight trains for the Canadian Pacific Railway, until it was removed from service in 1959, and it was subsequently stored in front of the Weston shops with several other steam locomotives in the form of a scrap line.

In 1971, No. 972 visited the Strasburg Rail Road in Strasburg to promote the future opening of the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania. On October 25, 1975, No. 972 led a double-headed excursion train in front of Ex-Florida East Coast (FEC) 4-6-2 No. 148 from Bethlehem to South Plainfield, New Jersey. That trip was a "Farewell to the Lehigh Valley" trip, since the LV was to be merged into Conrail the following year. However, that trip was also plagued by the poor condition of the trackage they rode on, and rain was downpouring across the states of Pennsylvania and New Jersey that day.

No. 972 subsequently returned to Jim Thorpe to continue pulling excursion trains throughout Carbon County. The locomotive returned to the Strasburg Rail Road to pull a tourist train for the National Railway Historical Society (NRHS) in March 1979. In October 1983, during the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Reading Company, No. 972 was re-lettered to 'Philadelphia and Reading', and it was selected to pull an excursion train in commemoration of the occasion, since none of the preserved Reading steam locomotives were available at the time. After Andrew Muller founded the Blue Mountain and Reading Railroad (BM&R), No. 972 began pulling trains out of Reading. In 1985, No. 972 was re-lettered again to 'Cumberland Valley' to pull commemorative trains for the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Cumberland Valley Railroad (CV). By the end of that year, however, the locomotive was removed from excursion service, since Hart's contract with the city of Jim Thrope expired. While making negotiations with the city to renew his contract, Hart moved No. 972 back to Strasburg for a heavy rebuild.

Today it's still at the Strasburg Railroad but it's stored outdoors and disassembled in the Strasburg Railroad's yard. As a result of this, Hart had gave up on steam locomotive preservation, and he sold off all of his equipment.

Trivia

  • As of 2022, the tender is still lettered Cumberland Valley Railroad.
  • It eventually became famous for pulling multiple mainline excursion trains throughout the state of Pennsylvania under the ownership of George Hart.
  • It was sold to the Strasburg Railroad in 1995, who had an initial plan to rebuild it to pull their own tourist trains.
  • Since No. 972 was stored on Strasburg property for a rebuild that hadn't been paid for, the locomotive was sold to the Strasburg Railroad as a compensation. With the locomotive now under their possession, the Strasburg Railroad made plans to masquerade No. 972 as a Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) G5, in order to fill in for their recently-retired PRR locomotives 1223 and 7002. This masquerade was to include replacing its firebox with a Belpaire one and moving its headlight to the top of the smokebox door.
  • In early 1966, No. 972 became the last steam locomotive to be sold by the CPR. Steam locomotive historian and former Reading Company employee George M. Hart purchased it with the hopes of using it to pull his own mainline excursion trains under his private company Rail Tours Incorporated.
  • As time progressed, however, the Strasburg Railroad had already rostered five operational steam locomotives, which was more than their crews could handle at the same time, and No. 972's rebuild was cancelled as a result.

JNR D51 Class No. D51-200

D51-200 is a 2-8-2 tender locomotive from the Japanese National Railways.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built in 1938 by the JNR (Hamanatsu) works it was primarily used as a goods locomotives and were an adaptation of the earlier Class D50.

During World War II, it was used to supply weapons and vehicles for the Japanese Imperial Army. In addition to Japan, it was built for export to South Korea, Taiwan and the USSR, totalling 1,184 locomotives.

It used to Operate at the SL-Kitabiwako from 1995-2021 to promote tourism in the Hubei area.

It is now operational at the Umekoji Museum Depot in Umekoji, Kyoto, Japan.

Trivia

  • Hiro is another member of this class.
  • It was suspended in May of 2021 due to Covid restrictions and difficulty obtaining parts.

Gallery

Virginian Railway No. 906

Virginian Railway Class AG No. 906 was a 2-6-6-6 class AG "Blue Ridge" type steam locomotive that runs on the Virginian Railway.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built in 1945 by the Lima Locomotive Works it was used on the Virginian Railroad to pull power coal trains from White Sulphur Springs, WV to Allegheny, VA for much of its career.

The locomotive was retired from active service in 1955 and it was put in storage then later it was sold for scrap in 1960.

Trivia

  • Sam is another member of this class although he shares his number with a member of his class.

Canadian National Class U-4-a No. 6400

6400 is a CNR U-4-a class tender engine.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built by the Montreal Locomotive Works in 1936 for the Canadian National Railway, it was the first U-4 class "Confederation" to be delivered and was used for passenger service for much of its career.

In 1939, it was chosen to handle the Royal Train for King George VI and Queen Elizabeth of Britain when they made an extended visit to Canada.

During the 1939 Royal Tour, the 6400 only saw use while the train was on CN tracks (since CP tracks were used for half of the journey), and then only in Ontario, with a Mountain (#6028) providing much of the rest of the power of the journey (plus a few Pacifics and two elderly freight Mikados).

The locomotive was retired from active service sometime in the 1950's. After retirement, the 6400 was placed on display at the National Museum of Science & Technology in Ottawa, Canada. It remains there today, and is also the only surviving U-4 "Confederation".

Livery

The locomotive is painted in CN colors which is green with careful gold lining.

When it lead the Royal Train it was painted black and royal blue with gold trim for the occasion.

Trivia

  • Vinnie is a member of this class.
  • The 6400 was preserved not because it was the only surviving U-4; but because it attained fame twice.
  • It was on display at the 1939 New York World's Fair "Railroads on Parade" exhibit.
  • The Royal Coat of Arms that the engine wore for the Royal Train was mounted at the front of the engine whereas Canada's Coat of Arms appeared on the tender's side but with the crown element relocated to the front of the running-board skirting.
    • It almost looks like the Hogwarts Crest from the "Harry Potter" series, and the picture of the 3 crowns which were seen looks just like Duchess's crown symbol.
  • This was one of only five streamlined locomotives they were built by the Montreal Locomotive Works in 1936 for the Canadian National Railway, numbered 6400 to 6404.

North Pacific Coast No. 21 Thomas-Stetson

Thomas-Stetson is a boisterous cab-forward engine.

Lexi is based on this engine.

Technical Details

Real-life History

Built in 1901 at the road's Sausalito Shops and named "Thomas-Stetson" it was used for the North Pacific Coast Railroad hauling redwood lumber, local dairy and agricultural products, express and passengers.

The engine had insufficient adhesion weight and its oil burners were prone to damage due their proximity to its water tubes, and was unpopular with crews, its unusual appearance earning it the nickname "The Freak". #21 was scrapped in 1905.

Trivia

  • This special 4-4-0 was the first cab-forward locomotive and one of the first oil burners, as well as the first locomotive to use a marine boiler.
  • It was a rebuild of NPCRR #5, which was dismantled in 1897.

See also

References

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